On a flight from Las Vegas to New York this morning on route the two places got me thinking about the grand scheme of things as pertaining to the current American boxing landscape.

Boxing around the world has experienced a boom time this last year or so.

Largely driven by the return to popularity of the heavyweight division but also by the sheer wealth of international top-tier talent the professional sport has churned out these last few years.

The likes of Gennady Golovkin, Vasyl Lomachenko, Terrence Crawford, Errol Spence, Mikey Garcia to name just a few others from the current pound for pound global pool of talent.

But from a purely American point of view however, Vegas and New York have always traditionally been the two places in the States were many of the big fights have taken place in years gone by.

Furthermore, both places now appear to be putting on more and more championship bouts once again these last couple of years.

New York, after a brief hiatus due to insurance issues, has really started to generate a genuine buzz around big fights over the last year between Madison Square Garden and the Barclays Center.

The Barclays has played host to several big fights very recently.

Only last weekend the venue saw some superb displays from middleweight contender Jermall Charlo and super-featherweight champion Gervonta Davis.

This weekend again it plays host to a big fight card featuring Danny Jacobs, Jarrell Miller and Katie Taylor.

If you were to go off current momentum you’d probably have to give New York the edge in terms of the busier spot for big fights.

But Vegas will always be a lure for marquee matchups given its ability to raise large revenues, site fees and overall being a cheaper place to host an event.

All in all, this rivalry between these two iconic boxing destinations to stage big fights over the coming years should bode well for the sport.

The more the merrier.